PTSD, Therapy Services

How Can Therapy Help Me Overcome My PTSD?

Does it feel like fear and guilt are always looming in the background of your life? Does sudden sadness take over sometimes with no warning?

If so, you might be living with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) – a condition connected to traumatic experiences from one’s past. PTSD can make the world feel like a distant place, with loved ones feeling unreachable and everyday tasks unattainable. It is an unrelenting condition that gives its sufferers no escape from its barrage of unbearable symptoms. Thankfully, therapy is a great option for anyone looking to gain control of their lives again.

Let’s explore how therapy can help individuals suffering from PTSD.

Depression Concept with Human, Broken Brain and Heavy Rain
Depression Concept with Heavy Rain directly aimed at depressive Human Profile with a broken Brain. Illustrated with Chalk on Blackboard

How Do I Know If I’m Suffering From PTSD?

PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, has become more common as awareness grows
around it. But, how can you be sure if PTSD is what’s driving your inner-turmoil?

Symptoms of PTSD can range from mild to severe and can begin immediately after a traumatic event or show up months later. Signs such as difficulty in relationships, nightmares, panic attacks and avoidance behaviors towards certain places or activities may all indicate that PTSD is impacting your life.

However, the only way to be certain if PTSD is the underlying cause is to consult a mental health professional who can evaluate your symptoms and help create a personalized treatment plan if necessary. Don’t suffer in silence – understanding PTSD starts with consulting someone who can help.
What Is Therapy?

Therapy is an incredibly important tool that can help individuals in many different ways. It
provides a safe, non-judgemental environment where someone can explore parts of
themselves, find emotional resolution, and make meaningful changes to their life.

It is often described as a collaborative process between the therapist and the client.
The therapist helps the client to draw on their own resources and insights by posing thoughtful questions and offering strategies for addressing challenges in their lives.
Ultimately, therapy is an essential part of growth that can provide new perspectives and cultivate personal understanding.

What Are The Different Types Of Trauma Therapy?

PTSD therapies come in many shapes and sizes, so finding the right one for you is key.
Psychotherapy can include cognitive behavioral therapy, which helps individuals understand their PTSD better, as well as counseling that allows individuals to work through any underlying trauma or mental health problems.

For those looking for a more physical approach, neurological techniques such as Neurofeedback Training are also available. This focuses on measuring and regulating brain activity with advanced EEG monitoring systems in order to help PTSD sufferers regain control of their thoughts and emotions.

No matter which type of PTSD therapy is chosen, the main goal remains the same – to manage symptoms and allow those with PTSD to return to a healthy life.

Psychotherapy: Cognitive Processing Therapy

PTSD can have a huge impact on someone’s life, and cognitive reprocessing therapy is a greatoption to help manage it.This specific form of psychotherapy focuses on helping individuals reframe the thoughts and memories that trigger PTSD symptoms. It helps people in distress reassess their traumatic experiences so they can move past them without reliving the trauma each time.

It’s also effective for working through why certain situations evoke strong responses and how to better cope, making it an invaluable PTSD therapy choice for anyone looking for relief.

Psychotherapy: Prolonged Exposure Therapy

Prolonged exposure therapy is a PTSD therapy that, rather than avoiding the memories of
traumatic events, helps individuals confront them through detailed re-telling of the situation and related management of fear.

It has been found to be one of the most successful PTSD therapies, which is perhaps why it is long-term—individuals can benefit from it spread over an extended period. Sessions are tailored to each participant’s traumas, allowing for personalised treatment so that
recovery can begin as soon as possible. It is a safe and effective way to aid those suffering from PTSD in recovery, but also has been used by people who experienced other traumas such as single event trauma or bullying.

Neurological: Eye Movement Desensitization and Response

EMDR works by connecting cognitive information with biologic trauma reactions and allowing the patient to process the traumatic event in a safe environment.

It involves having the person track bilateral stimulation, such as alternating sounds or
side-to-side eye motions, to help decrease activation of trauma memories.
EMDR offers PTSD victims an innovative and effective approach to treating their condition, thus providing them with greater psychological freedom and life satisfaction.

Neurological: Emotional Freedom Technique

The premise of EFT is that a person will talk through their traumatic experience while physically tapping on acupuncture points around the body.

This practice serves to desensitize a person from their PTSD triggers, creating more neural
pathways in their brain and ultimately allowing them to develop more control over their
emotions.

While the efficacy of this type of PTSD therapy is yet to be conclusively proven, many
proponents believe that it could provide an empowering alternative in PTSD treatment.

What Is The Best Treatment For PTSD?

When it comes to how to treat PTSD, every psychiatrist has their own favorite flavor of therapy. Some like to babble on psychoanalytically about the root cause, some swear by specific treatments, and others just rely on time for emotional healing.

But if there’s one thing that far outshines the rest when it comes to treating PTSD, it’s targeted trauma-focused therapy. Trauma therapy programs work swiftly and effectively in helping PTSD sufferers break free from the chains of trauma, allowing them to begin the process of healing in a healthier, more meaningful way.

So if you’re looking for the very best kind of therapy to help you cope with your post-traumatic stress disorder – you may want to consider it!

Female hand trying to connect a missing jigsaw puzzle of human brain on gray background. Creative idea for solving problem, memory loss, dementia or Alzheimer’s disease concept. Mental health care.

The Benefits of Trying Therapy For PTSD:

PTSD can cause us to feel disconnected from ourselves and the people who love us, as we try to make sense of PTSD’s effects on our lives. But PTSD is also treatable, and therapy is an important part of that process.

A few ways therapy can help you overcome your PTSD:

  1. Relief from symptoms:

    Many people who suffer from PTSD find that their symptoms
    improve after starting therapy. This can include a decrease in flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety, and depression.

  2. Improved relationships:

    PTSD can often strain relationships with family, friends, and
    partners. Therapy can help to improve communication and build trust.

  3. Greater self-awareness:

    Therapy can help you to understand your triggers and how to cope
    with them. This can lead to greater self-awareness and control over your emotions.

  4. Coping skills:

    Therapy can teach you healthy coping mechanisms to deal with your PTSD
    symptoms. This can include relaxation techniques, journaling, and exposure therapy.

  5. Hope:

    For many people suffering from PTSD, therapy offers hope for a better future. It can
    help you to see that your symptoms are manageable and that you can live a happy and fulfilling life despite your diagnosis.


Is Therapy The Key To Unlocking Your PTSD?

PTSD can be an incredibly difficult disorder to live with, but, if you live in Maryland, Gemini
Health can guide you
in beginning the journey of recovery. While the process is often hard and lengthy, there are many people who have turned to PTSD therapy and have found it to be the best choice they make for themselves.

Through PTSD therapy, people find a safe haven to talk with a professional and share their stories without fear of judgment or consequence. Sessions often provide individuals with fresh perspectives and new ways of thinking about how to cope with their PTSD symptoms. PTSD therapy offers benefits that no other form of treatment can provide: true healing from the inside out. With PTSD therapy, many individuals gain confidence, security, and even a newfound purpose in life.

For these reasons and more, pursuing PTSD therapy is almost always worth it—and most
who try it don’t regret their decision!

Sources:
https://www.healthline.com/health/ptsd-treatment#neurological-therapies
https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/types-of-mental-health-problems/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-ptsd-and-complex-ptsd/symptoms/
https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/treatments/prolonged-exposure
https://www.apa.org/ptsd-guideline/treatments/eye-movement-reprocessing
https://www.reliasmedia.com/articles/142914-emotional-freedom-technique-and-post-traumatic stress disorder

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Anxiety

When To See a Therapist For Anxiety

Feeling anxious is a regular part of life. Think about the way you felt before a big presentation, or the butterflies in your stomach when getting ready for a first date.

We all experience anxiety at one time or another.

Believe it or not, anxiety can actually be good for us because it helps us to stay focused and alert. But it can hurt us by making us feel stressed out or fearful.

While all of us have felt anxiety before, the frequency and intensity to which we experience it can determine if we have an anxiety disorder or not.

If you feel like your anxiety is interfering with your daily routine, seeing a therapist can help you find ways to manage your stress and find relief from symptoms, leading you to live a happier, more peaceful life.

What Is Anxiety?

But what is anxiety?

Anxiety is a normal human emotion. It’s the feeling you get when something bad could happen. It makes sense we feel this way: every one of us wants to avoid feeling pain. But some people experience anxiety more frequently than others, and for some people, the normal feelings of worry or nervousness can spiral into intense fear and panic attacks.

This is called generalized anxiety disorder. Since it isn’t tied to any specific event or stressor, it affects how someone feels in general.

There are several other types of anxiety as well; these include social phobia (anxiety about social situations), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder (PD), and specific phobias like fear of heights or spiders.

If You’re Experiencing Panic Attacks or Avoidance Of Public Places, Seeing a Therapist May Be a Good Idea:

Panic attacks and avoiding public places are both symptoms of anxiety. Both of these symptoms can cause immense suffering and difficulty in day-to-day living.

If you’re having either of these symptoms, it may help to visit an anxiety counselor or therapist who can guide you through therapy and help teach coping mechanisms for when the symptoms come back again.

Types Of Therapy For Anxiety:

There are many types of therapy for anxiety symptoms, but these are the most commonly used:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a form of psychotherapy that focuses on patterns of thinking and behavior. It looks at how your thoughts, feelings, and actions influence each other and can help you learn to adjust your thinking to reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) combines cognitive behavioral therapy with mindfulness techniques to teach you how to react differently in situations that make you feel anxious or upset. It helps people who struggle with self-harm or suicidal thoughts.
  • Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT), also known as “mindfulness-based cognitive behavioral therapy” (MBCT), teaches you how to accept your feelings instead of trying to change them or avoid them altogether — which can lead to even more stress.

What Is The Best Treatment For Anxiety?

While there are many treatments for anxiety, here are two of the most effective ones:

  • Medication: In some cases, your doctor may prescribe medications to treat your panic attacks and other symptoms of anxiety. Medications can be helpful when used in combination with additional therapies (like CBT), but they’re not always necessary or appropriate.
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): This type of psychotherapy has been found to be one of the most effective ways to manage anxiety disorders. During CBT sessions, you learn how to identify and change negative thought patterns associated with your condition. In turn, this improves how you feel about yourself and boosts self-esteem through positive reinforcement from others around you.

By gradually changing these bad habits over time through repeated practice, you become better able to deal with stressors as they occur instead of reacting negatively out of habit or fear instead of reason—which is exactly what happens during an anxiety attack!

What Are Some Alternative Therapies For Anxiety?

If you’re not interested in seeing a therapist, consider trying some of the following alternative therapies to help combat your anxiety:

  • Meditation and Yoga: These two practices can be used alone or together to reduce stress, relax the mind and improve overall well-being.
  • Breathing Techniques: Deep breathing is often taught as a way to control anxiety and stress levels. If you struggle with shallow breathing on a regular basis, this may be something you want to experiment with before classifying it as another form of self-care—it could lead to better sleep quality if practiced regularly!
  • Massage therapy has also been shown effective in reducing symptoms associated with anxiety disorders; however, there are no specific guidelines based on this research yet because studies have yielded mixed results overall so far. This is an area worth exploring further but should not replace traditional treatments such as psychotherapy or medication when necessary.

Benefits of Seeing a Therapist For Your Anxiety:

While therapy promotes many positive benefits, here are a few of the most common:

  • You can talk to someone about your problems. Anxiety can feel like a huge burden to carry on your own, and there’s nothing wrong with seeking help from someone who is trained in dealing with it.
  • You can learn new ways to cope with your anxiety. A therapist will help you realize that there are other options besides just managing the symptoms of anxiety, such as learning how to meditate or do breathing exercises.
  • You’ll learn how to manage your anxiety better so it doesn’t take over your life! For example, you could use some tips from an expert on how not to let fear control you when things get tough—or even start up an exercise routine together! Who knows? Maybe this therapist will become part of their support network too!
  • It gives you a second opinion when needed: Sometimes we’re too close emotionally (or physically) tied into our situation that we don’t see things clearly anymore. Seeking help from a therapist gives you an unbiased opinion from an outside party.

All In All:

We all need some help from time to time, and this is especially true for those who are experiencing anxiety. Seeing a therapist for your anxiety can be very helpful in getting you back on track to living the life that you want, instead of allowing fear and worry to take over. If you’re looking for anxiety therapy in Maryland, look no further than Gemini Health. We’re here to help you get your life, and anxiety back on track.

Resources:

https://adaa.org/learn-from-us/from-the-experts/blog-posts/consumer/how-know-when-seek-therapy#:~:text=It’s%20never%20too%20early%20to,you%20want%20because%20of%20fear

https://therapygroupdc.com/therapist-dc-blog/different-types-of-therapy-which-is-best-for-anxiety/

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An adult man, looking happy, talking with group therapy members
Group therapy, Therapy Services

How To Find A Support Group to Help You Heal

Supportive therapy can be a wonderful resource when you are going through significant challenges in your life.

They provide a safe place to share experiences, feelings, and coping strategies with other people who have been in similar situations. Sometimes all you need when managing a tough season in life is someone who truly understands you.

However, there is an art to getting the most out of them.

This guide will help you navigate finding the right support group therapy for yourself and maximize their potential as part of your healing journey.

A group therapy group for depression

What Is Supportive Group Therapy?

Supportive group therapy is a form of therapy that is designed to help people who are struggling with a variety of mental health issues or life circumstances.

The goal of this type of therapy is to provide a safe and supportive environment for people to share their experiences and receive support from others who are going through similar challenges.

This type of therapy can be helpful for people who are struggling with issues such as depression, anxiety, or addiction.

Support groups are a great place to find support and advice from people who have been there. They provide an opportunity to be open with others while sharing experiences.

Supportive Therapy Techniques:

Supportive therapy can be helpful in many situations because it’s structured and uses methods similar to those used by other types of group therapies.

For example, supportive therapy may help you learn new skills and develop healthier ways of coping with stress and anxiety.

Because this form of group therapy is more structured than some other forms, it usually takes place over a shorter period—usually only one hour per week or less.

Now, you might be wondering – “Is supportive therapy evidence based?”  Okay, maybe not in those exact words, but in a nutshell, you may be curious if there’s science to back it up.

Yes, supportive group therapy is evidence-based. There is a large body of research that supports the use of group therapy for a variety of mental health conditions. Groups provide a supportive and therapeutic environment that can help people feel less alone, connected to others, and improve their mental health.

Finding The Best Support Group For You:

Decide What Kind Of Support You’re Looking For:

When you’re looking for a support group, it’s important to understand that there are different types of groups. Some focus on specific issues like trauma, addiction, or family violence.

Others are more general and include many types of issues in their focus. Some groups may be open to self-identifying with a particular issue while others may require members to have been diagnosed with a disorder by a professional in order to attend.

Supportive therapy groups come in all shapes and sizes, for example:

  • Opioid overdose supportive therapy
  • Alcohol withdrawal syndrome supportive therapy
  • Supportive cancer therapy
  • Supportive drug therapy

Some groups meet weekly; others meet monthly and some meet less frequently than that.

Before deciding which type of support would work best for you, it’s important to realize what it is exactly that you hope your experience will accomplish: do you want someone else’s perspective on why things happened the way they did?

Do want someone else who has experienced similar things to tell their stories?

Or maybe all this sharing doesn’t appeal to you at all—maybe what would help most is connecting with another person who knows what it’s like not just because they’ve gone through something similar but because they’ve lived through it themselves (and survived).

Ask For Recommendations:

The best way to find a support group is to ask for recommendations. Your friends, family, and co-workers may be able to share their own experiences with support groups.

If you don’t know anyone who has been in a group before, ask your doctor or therapist if they have any suggestions. They will also be able to tell you if there are any groups that they recommend over others.

If none of these options work out for you, try contacting your insurance company directly; they may have information on which programs its providers participate in (and whether those programs offer the type of support you’re looking for).

You can also type in a quick Google search, “Support group therapy near me” to find a list of different options close by.

Call Ahead and Ask Questions:

When you call a support group leader to ask about joining, be sure to ask the following questions:

  • What size is the group?
  • What is its format?
  • What philosophy does it follow, if any? (Likely choices include cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoanalysis.)
  • Are there any fees or other costs associated with participation in this group?
  • Where do meetings take place (at an office building, a school, etc.)?
  • When do they occur—and what times of day are most convenient for me?

Plan Ahead For The Financial Cost (If Any):

Meetings are typically free of charge, but some groups charge a nominal fee for attendance.

This allows them to cover expenses, such as renting space and paying for refreshments or childcare.

If there is a fee charged by the organization running your chosen meeting place (or if there isn’t), consider how much money this would represent over time.

Think of it as part of an investment in your own healing process—one which could save hundreds if not thousands of dollars in the long run when compared with seeking professional counseling services from providers who charge several hundred dollars per session on average!

If necessary, take steps ahead of time so that you can prepare enough cash on hand at least once per month while attending meetings so as not to miss any due dates should unforeseen circumstances arise requiring immediate attention during those sessions; however keep in mind that most group leaders work hard at keeping costs low so as not to exclude anyone who might otherwise benefit greatly from attending regularly.

Supportive Therapy Is An Invaluable Resource:

If you’re struggling right now, it’s important to remember that you don’t have to face it alone.

Support group therapy is there to help you heal and recover from mental illness, or navigate the tricky waters of life.

They can provide valuable insight into what your recovery might look like and how others have managed it in the past. Therapy support centers like Gemini Health are ready and waiting to help you get connected with others and live a happier, healthier life.

Resources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/indepth/support-groups/art-20044655

https://www.mhanational.org/find-support-groups

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/therapy-medication/supportgroups.htm

https://www.verywellmind.com/find-a-support-group-meeting-near-you-69433#:~:text=How%20to%20Find%20the%20Right,of%20the%20various%20support%20groups.

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Sick woman talking with a doctor at an outpatient treatment center
Therapy Services

Outpatient Treatment: What Does It Mean?

It’s no secret that mental health is something that should be taken seriously.

However, people often neglect their mental health when they don’t view it as a high priority. But the truth is, your mental health is just as important as your physical health.

In addition, some people may not have the means to check themselves into inpatient treatment. They may have jobs they can’t miss, or children to take care of. This can prevent them from receiving the care they desperately need.

If you’re struggling with depression, anxiety, or any other mental illness, outpatient treatment can be a great option for you.

In this article you will find an outpatient therapy definition, and the benefits it can bring to your life.

outpatient therapy patients sharing their problems
Members of group therapy listening to patient sharing her problems

What Is Outpatient Therapy?

Outpatient treatment is a type of mental health treatment that allows you to live at home while receiving therapy and other services.

This form of treatment is typically less intensive than inpatient, therefore may be a good option if you’re struggling with mild to moderate depression or anxiety. Services offered in an outpatient setting can vary, but they might include individual or group therapy, medication management, and crisis intervention.

Outpatient behavioral health therapy can be an essential step in someone’s journey to recovery from mental illness. It can provide them with the support they need to make progress in their recovery while still being able to live at home and maintain their regular routine.

How Does Outpatient Treatment Work?

If you opt for outpatient treatment, you’ll typically meet with your therapist or case manager a few times each week.

These appointments will usually last for 60 to 90 minutes. In addition to meeting with your therapist, you might also have regular check-ins with a psychiatrist or nurse.

You might also attend group therapy sessions and participate in other activities, such as recreation therapy or art therapy.

How Long Does Outpatient Treatment Last?

The number and frequency of appointments will depend on your individual needs. If you’re struggling with more severe symptoms of depression or anxiety, you might need to meet with your therapist more often.

An outpatient program can last for as long as you need it to—some people only participate in treatment for a few weeks, while others continue attending sessions for months or even years.

Once you and your therapist feel like you’ve made progress in treatment and reached your goals, you can begin slowly tapering off of therapy.

What Are The Benefits Of An Outpatient Treatment Program?

There are many benefits to an outpatient behavioral health therapy program. Let’s touch on a few of the most important:

1. You Can Get Treatment While Maintaining Your Normal Life

 One of the main benefits of outpatient treatment is that you can get the help you need while still maintaining your normal schedule. If you have a full-time job or you’re a student, you can continue going to work or school while you’re receiving treatment. This can be a great option for people who can’t take time off from their responsibilities to find treatment.

2. You’ll Be in a Safe and Supportive Environment

 When you receive outpatient treatment, you’ll be in a safe and supportive environment where you can feel comfortable sharing your thoughts and feelings. You’ll be surrounded by people who understand what you’re going through and who want to help you get better. This kind of encouragement can be incredibly helpful when struggling with mental illness.

3. You Can Get Individualized Care

 Outpatient treatment programs offer individualized care, which means that your care will be tailored specifically to your needs. Your treatment plan will be designed based on your unique situation, so you can be sure that you’re getting the care that’s right for you.

Sick woman talking with a doctor at an outpatient treatment center
Sick woman talking with gynecologist about disease in the clinic

Inpatient vs. Outpatient Mental Health: Which Is Better?

While there is no clear-cut answer as to which is “better”, it all comes down to each person’s unique mental health experience. There are certainly pros and cons to both inpatient treatment and OP therapy. Let’s discuss a few.

First, inpatient treatment provides 24/7 care and supervision. If you’re in the midst of a mental health crisis, this can be invaluable. There will always be someone there to help you through difficult moments, and you won’t have to worry about being left alone during a time of vulnerability.

In addition, an inpatient program can give you space away from home to heal. When you’re dealing with mental health issues, it can be difficult to cope with everyday life.

Inpatient treatment gives you the chance to step away from everything and focus on your recovery. This can be an immensely helpful experience, as it allows you to come back to everyday life feeling refreshed and better equipped to handle whatever comes your way.

Inpatient is a better option for those struggling with more severe mental health issues, mental health crises, or those who feel as though they can’t make progress at home.

Outpatient treatment on the other hand is often less expensive and is a wonderful option for those who need to handle their daily responsibilities while receiving treatment.

Inpatient Treatment Is Not Your Only Option:

If you or someone you love is struggling with mental illness, please know that there are resources available to help you. For example, here at Gemini Health, we strive to assist all patients with every aspect of their health, no matter what their circumstances may look like.

Our outpatient behavioral health therapy may be a good option for you or your loved one. It is important to seek help from a professional if you are struggling so that you can get on the path to recovery and improve your overall well-being. Inpatient treatment is not the end-all be-all for mental health services. Contact us today to discuss how we can help you get back to your best self.

Resources:

https://www.pchtreatment.com/inpatient-vs-outpatient-mental-health-treatment/

https://www.goodtherapy.org/difference-inpatient-outpatient.html

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