An adult man, looking happy, talking with group therapy members
Group therapy, Therapy Services

How To Find A Support Group to Help You Heal

Supportive therapy can be a wonderful resource when you are going through significant challenges in your life.

They provide a safe place to share experiences, feelings, and coping strategies with other people who have been in similar situations. Sometimes all you need when managing a tough season in life is someone who truly understands you.

However, there is an art to getting the most out of them.

This guide will help you navigate finding the right support group therapy for yourself and maximize their potential as part of your healing journey.

A group therapy group for depression

What Is Supportive Group Therapy?

Supportive group therapy is a form of therapy that is designed to help people who are struggling with a variety of mental health issues or life circumstances.

The goal of this type of therapy is to provide a safe and supportive environment for people to share their experiences and receive support from others who are going through similar challenges.

This type of therapy can be helpful for people who are struggling with issues such as depression, anxiety, or addiction.

Support groups are a great place to find support and advice from people who have been there. They provide an opportunity to be open with others while sharing experiences.

Supportive Therapy Techniques:

Supportive therapy can be helpful in many situations because it’s structured and uses methods similar to those used by other types of group therapies.

For example, supportive therapy may help you learn new skills and develop healthier ways of coping with stress and anxiety.

Because this form of group therapy is more structured than some other forms, it usually takes place over a shorter period—usually only one hour per week or less.

Now, you might be wondering – “Is supportive therapy evidence based?”  Okay, maybe not in those exact words, but in a nutshell, you may be curious if there’s science to back it up.

Yes, supportive group therapy is evidence-based. There is a large body of research that supports the use of group therapy for a variety of mental health conditions. Groups provide a supportive and therapeutic environment that can help people feel less alone, connected to others, and improve their mental health.

Finding The Best Support Group For You:

Decide What Kind Of Support You’re Looking For:

When you’re looking for a support group, it’s important to understand that there are different types of groups. Some focus on specific issues like trauma, addiction, or family violence.

Others are more general and include many types of issues in their focus. Some groups may be open to self-identifying with a particular issue while others may require members to have been diagnosed with a disorder by a professional in order to attend.

Supportive therapy groups come in all shapes and sizes, for example:

  • Opioid overdose supportive therapy
  • Alcohol withdrawal syndrome supportive therapy
  • Supportive cancer therapy
  • Supportive drug therapy

Some groups meet weekly; others meet monthly and some meet less frequently than that.

Before deciding which type of support would work best for you, it’s important to realize what it is exactly that you hope your experience will accomplish: do you want someone else’s perspective on why things happened the way they did?

Do want someone else who has experienced similar things to tell their stories?

Or maybe all this sharing doesn’t appeal to you at all—maybe what would help most is connecting with another person who knows what it’s like not just because they’ve gone through something similar but because they’ve lived through it themselves (and survived).

Ask For Recommendations:

The best way to find a support group is to ask for recommendations. Your friends, family, and co-workers may be able to share their own experiences with support groups.

If you don’t know anyone who has been in a group before, ask your doctor or therapist if they have any suggestions. They will also be able to tell you if there are any groups that they recommend over others.

If none of these options work out for you, try contacting your insurance company directly; they may have information on which programs its providers participate in (and whether those programs offer the type of support you’re looking for).

You can also type in a quick Google search, “Support group therapy near me” to find a list of different options close by.

Call Ahead and Ask Questions:

When you call a support group leader to ask about joining, be sure to ask the following questions:

  • What size is the group?
  • What is its format?
  • What philosophy does it follow, if any? (Likely choices include cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoanalysis.)
  • Are there any fees or other costs associated with participation in this group?
  • Where do meetings take place (at an office building, a school, etc.)?
  • When do they occur—and what times of day are most convenient for me?

Plan Ahead For The Financial Cost (If Any):

Meetings are typically free of charge, but some groups charge a nominal fee for attendance.

This allows them to cover expenses, such as renting space and paying for refreshments or childcare.

If there is a fee charged by the organization running your chosen meeting place (or if there isn’t), consider how much money this would represent over time.

Think of it as part of an investment in your own healing process—one which could save hundreds if not thousands of dollars in the long run when compared with seeking professional counseling services from providers who charge several hundred dollars per session on average!

If necessary, take steps ahead of time so that you can prepare enough cash on hand at least once per month while attending meetings so as not to miss any due dates should unforeseen circumstances arise requiring immediate attention during those sessions; however keep in mind that most group leaders work hard at keeping costs low so as not to exclude anyone who might otherwise benefit greatly from attending regularly.

Supportive Therapy Is An Invaluable Resource:

If you’re struggling right now, it’s important to remember that you don’t have to face it alone.

Support group therapy is there to help you heal and recover from mental illness, or navigate the tricky waters of life.

They can provide valuable insight into what your recovery might look like and how others have managed it in the past. Therapy support centers like Gemini Health are ready and waiting to help you get connected with others and live a happier, healthier life.

Resources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/indepth/support-groups/art-20044655

https://www.mhanational.org/find-support-groups

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/therapy-medication/supportgroups.htm

https://www.verywellmind.com/find-a-support-group-meeting-near-you-69433#:~:text=How%20to%20Find%20the%20Right,of%20the%20various%20support%20groups.

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